summary report on Menominee Indian education: 1968-1970
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summary report on Menominee Indian education: 1968-1970 by Arthur M. Harkins

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Published by University of Minnesota, Training Center for Community Programs in Minneapolis .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Menominee Indians -- Education.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Statementby Arthur M. Harkins, I. Karon Sherarts [and] Karen Nordby.
SeriesThe National study of American Indian education
ContributionsSherarts, I. Karon, joint author., Nordby, Karen, joint author.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE99.M44 H4
The Physical Object
Paginationiii l., 141 p.
Number of Pages141
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5028220M
LC Control Number73623114

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INTRODUCTION Since July, , the Training Center for Community Programs, University of Minnesota has produced eleven interim reports on the education of Indian children in Menominee County, Wisconsin. This summary report is the twelfth and final in the series. The titles of the eleven previous reports are. A summary report on Menominee Indian education: Urban Indian education in Minneapolis: an interim analysis of survey materials gathered from school officials and influential persons: Selected Co-authors Countries and Regions of Publication (2. A Summary Report on Menominee Indian Education: January This summary is the 12th and final report on this American Indian tribe's progress since Federal trusteeship was.   Paperback. Published: 25 June Pages | 75 illus. & 3 maps. /2 x /4 inches. ISBN:

Medin and Bang then report on the development of ecologically oriented and community-based science education programs on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin and at the American Indian Center . FOR GENERATIONS, Indian people suffered a grinding poverty and political and cultural suppression on the reservations. But tenacious and visionary tribal leaders refused to give in. They knew their rights and insisted that the treaties be honored. Against all odds, beginning shortly after World War II, they began to succeed. The modern tribal sovereignty movement deserves to be spoken of in 5/5(2). Welcome to the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. The Menominee Tribe's history is unique because our origin or creation begins at the mouth of the Menominee River, a mere 60 miles east of our present Menominee Indian Reservation. This is where our five clans: ancestral Bear, Eagle, Wolf, Moose, and Crane were created. Letters received and reports, Time book for Indian labor, Record of work performed and of goods paid to Indians for labor, Journal for issues to Indians, Ledger for Indian labor, Cashbook, Records of the Malki Indian Agency, CA.

ERIC ED Menominee Restoration Act: H.R. To Repeal the Act Terminating Federal Supervision Over the Property and Members of the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin as a Federally Recognized, Sovereign Indian Tribe; and to Restore to the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin Those Federal Services Furnished to American Indians Because of Their Status as American Indians; and .   Menominee Indian Mills, Keshena, Wisconsin I. General Records Correspondence with Other Indian Agencies, Miscellaneous Correspondence of Mill Officials, Miscellaneous Records of the Forest Supervisor, Correspondence Related to Purchasing, Correspondence Related to Wartime Priority Purchasing, Correspondence . Indian termination was the policy of the United States from the mids to the mids. It was shaped by a series of laws and policies with the intent of assimilating Native Americans into mainstream American society. Assimilation was not new since the belief that indigenous people should abandon their traditional lives and become what the government considered "civilized" had been the. First Nations Studies provides services at schools with concentrations of First Nations students.. First Nations Studies is funded through an Education Formula Grant to Milwaukee Public Schools by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Indian Education (Title VII of Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Part A, Subpart 1).The amount of the grant is determined by the number of First.